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Forbidden fruit: human settlement and abundant fruit create an ecological trap for an apex omnivore

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 2,129)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
320 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
176 Mendeley
Title
Forbidden fruit: human settlement and abundant fruit create an ecological trap for an apex omnivore
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, September 2016
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12589
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clayton T. Lamb, Garth Mowat, Bruce N. McLellan, Scott E. Nielsen, Stan Boutin

Abstract

Habitat choice is an evolutionary product of animals experiencing increased fitness when preferentially occupying high-quality habitat. However, an ecological trap (ET) can occur when an animal is presented with novel conditions and the animal's assessment of habitat quality is poorly matched to its resulting fitness. We tested for an ET for grizzly (brown) bears using demographic and movement data collected in an area with rich food resources and concentrated human settlement. We derived measures of habitat attractiveness from occurrence models of bear food resources and estimated demographic parameters using DNA mark-recapture information collected over 8 years (2006-2013). We then paired this information with grizzly bear mortality records to investigate kill and movement rates. Our results demonstrate that a valley high in both berry resources and human density was more attractive than surrounding areas, and bears occupying this region faced 17% lower apparent survival. Despite lower fitness, we detected a net flow of bears into the ET, which contributed to a study-wide population decline. This work highlights the presence and pervasiveness of an ET for an apex omnivore that lacks the evolutionary cues, under human-induced rapid ecological change, to assess trade-offs between food resources and human-caused mortality, which results in maladaptive habitat selection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 320 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 176 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bulgaria 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 168 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 51 29%
Researcher 34 19%
Student > Master 31 18%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Other 10 6%
Other 20 11%
Unknown 10 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 105 60%
Environmental Science 46 26%
Engineering 2 1%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 16 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 378. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2019.
All research outputs
#31,808
of 14,372,944 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#4
of 2,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,439
of 266,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#1
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,372,944 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,978 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.