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Evolution of microtubule organizing centers across the tree of eukaryotes

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Journal, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
68 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
95 Mendeley
Title
Evolution of microtubule organizing centers across the tree of eukaryotes
Published in
Plant Journal, March 2013
DOI 10.1111/tpj.12145
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naoji Yubuki, Brian S. Leander

Abstract

The architecture of eukaryotic cells is underpinned by complex arrrays of microtubules that stem from an organizing center, referred to as the MTOC. With few exceptions, MTOCs consist of two basal bodies that anchor flagellar axonemes and different configurations of microtubular roots. Variations in the structure of this cytoskeletal system, also referred to as the 'flagellar apparatus', reflect phylogenetic relationships and provide compelling evidence for inferring the overall tree of eukaryotes. However, reconstructions and subsequent comparisons of the flagellar apparatus are challenging, because these studies require sophisticated microscopy, spatial reasoning and detailed terminology. In an attempt to understand the unifying features of MTOCs and broad patterns of cytoskeletal homology across the tree of eukaryotes, we present a comprehensive overview of the eukaryotic flagellar apparatus within a modern molecular phylogenetic context. Specifically, we used the known cytoskeletal diversity within major groups of eukaryotes to infer the unifying features (ancestral states) for the flagellar apparatus in the Plantae, Opisthokonta, Amoebozoa, Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria, Excavata, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Apusozoa, Breviata and Collodictyonidae. We then mapped these data onto the tree of eukaryotes in order to trace broad patterns of trait changes during the evolutionary history of the flagellar apparatus. This synthesis suggests that: (i) the most recent ancestor of all eukaryotes already had a complex flagellar apparatus, (ii) homologous traits associated with the flagellar apparatus have a punctate distribution across the tree of eukaryotes, and (iii) streamlining (trait losses) of the ancestral flagellar apparatus occurred several times independently in eukaryotes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Norway 2 2%
Czechia 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Australia 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
France 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 82 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 22%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 6%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 8 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 22%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Physics and Astronomy 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 10 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2019.
All research outputs
#1,475,267
of 14,443,874 outputs
Outputs from Plant Journal
#447
of 5,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,070
of 245,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Journal
#3
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,443,874 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,496 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,970 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.