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Infection with the Lyme disease pathogen suppresses innate immunity in mice with diet-induced obesity.

Overview of attention for article published in Cellular Microbiology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 734)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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43 tweeters
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6 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Infection with the Lyme disease pathogen suppresses innate immunity in mice with diet-induced obesity.
Published in
Cellular Microbiology, October 2016
DOI 10.1111/cmi.12689
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zlotnikov, Nataliya, Javid, Ashkan, Ahmed, Mijhgan, Eshghi, Azad, Tang, Tian Tian, Arya, Anoop, Bansal, Anil, Matar, Fatima, Parikh, Maitry, Ebady, Rhodaba, Koh, Adeline, Gupta, Nupur, Song, Peng, Zhang, Yang, Newbigging, Susan, Wormser, Gary P, Schwartz, Ira, Inman, Robert, Glogauer, Michael, Moriarty, Tara J, Wormser, Gary P., Moriarty, Tara J.

Abstract

Obesity is a major global public health concern. Immune responses implicated in obesity also control certain infections. We investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) on infection with the Lyme disease bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi in mice. DIO was associated with systemic suppression of neutrophil- and macrophage-based innate immune responses. These included bacterial uptake and cytokine production, and systemic, progressive impairment of bacterial clearance and increased carditis severity. B. burgdorferi-infected mice fed normal diet also gained weight at the same rate as uninfected mice fed HFD, Toll-like receptor 4 deficiency rescued bacterial clearance defects, which were greater in females than males, and killing of an unrelated bacterium (Escherichia coli) by bone marrow-derived macrophages from obese, B. burgdorferi-infected mice was also affected. Importantly, innate immune suppression increased with infection duration and depended on cooperative and synergistic interactions between DIO and B. burgdorferi infection. Thus, obesity and B. burgdorferi infection cooperatively and progressively suppressed innate immunity in mice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 45%
Professor 2 18%
Student > Master 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 18%
Philosophy 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Environmental Science 1 9%
Other 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2017.
All research outputs
#279,498
of 8,465,828 outputs
Outputs from Cellular Microbiology
#6
of 734 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,190
of 245,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cellular Microbiology
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,465,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 734 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,964 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.