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Troubling issues at the frontier of animal tracking for conservation and management

Overview of attention for article published in Conservation Biology, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 4,192)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
31 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
125 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
294 Mendeley
Title
Troubling issues at the frontier of animal tracking for conservation and management
Published in
Conservation Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12895
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven J. Cooke, Vivian M. Nguyen, Steven T. Kessel, Nigel E. Hussey, Nathan Young, Adam T. Ford

Abstract

Developments in electronic tagging and tracking, including biotelemetry and biologging, have provided unprecedented insight into the ecology of wild animals (Cooke et al. 2004) and revealed hidden movement patterns, habitat associations, animal-environment interactions, and mortality rates for even the most cryptic of species (Hussey et al. 2015; Kays et al. 2015). Natural history, ecology (including movement ecology), conservation, and resource management have all benefitted from the application of this technology. Yet, as use of electronic tagging in research and public awareness of this technology has increased, a number of troubling and unanticipated issues have emerged. We submit that these issues need to be addressed proactively by the diverse range of people involved in animal-tracking studies - manufacturers, funders, researchers, and animal-care committees. Ignoring these issues may have serious negative consequences for individual animals, animal populations, conservation, and the future use, regulation, and public perception of electronic tracking. We recount examples of such issues in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial realms. We did not consider issues related to the effects of capturing and fitting animals with tracking devices; these are discussed at length elsewhere (e.g., Wilson and McMahon 2006; Cooke et al. 2013). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 125 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 294 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 287 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 58 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 55 19%
Researcher 54 18%
Other 23 8%
Student > Bachelor 19 6%
Other 33 11%
Unknown 52 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 127 43%
Environmental Science 61 21%
Social Sciences 8 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 2%
Other 16 5%
Unknown 70 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 364. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2020.
All research outputs
#91,639
of 26,308,718 outputs
Outputs from Conservation Biology
#18
of 4,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,215
of 326,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conservation Biology
#2
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,308,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,192 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,858 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.