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A deskilling and challenging journey: the lived experience of Indonesian nurse returnees

Overview of attention for article published in International Nursing Review, February 2017
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
A deskilling and challenging journey: the lived experience of Indonesian nurse returnees
Published in
International Nursing Review, February 2017
DOI 10.1111/inr.12352
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kurniati, A., Chen, C.‐M., Efendi, F., Ogawa, R., A. Kurniati, C.-M. Chen, F. Efendi, R. Ogawa

Abstract

To illuminate the lived experiences of Indonesian nurses who previously worked as caregivers in Japanese residential care facilities, by exploring the journey of becoming returnees. The creation of bilateral agreements between Indonesia and Japan has facilitated the movement of Indonesian nurses to work as caregivers in Japan since 2008. While this decision raised concerns with regard to the degradation of nursing skills, little is known about this issue from the perspective of nurse returnees and how the experience affects their life. A hermeneutic phenomenological method was employed for this study. A purposive sample of 15 Indonesian nurse returnees participated in this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in four of Indonesia's provinces between August and October 2015. Data were analysed thematically, supported by QSR NVIVO 10 software. Four key themes emerged from the data analysis: (i) returning home; (ii) going back to zero; (iii) walking through a difficult journey; and (iv) overcoming barriers. These findings described the lived experiences of nurse returnees when they got back to the country of origin. Indonesian nurse returnees experienced deskilling and struggled to re-enter the nursing profession or to find other non-nursing jobs. The significant impact of this migration on individual nurses with regard to maximizing the benefits of return migration deserves further investigation. The Indonesian government, jointly with other stakeholders, should develop a brain gain strategy to align returnees' expertise with the needs of the national labour market. The public-private partnership should be strengthened to utilize returnees in healthcare services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Unspecified 4 15%
Lecturer 4 15%
Other 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 9 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 50%
Unspecified 7 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,913,604
of 9,048,564 outputs
Outputs from International Nursing Review
#176
of 305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,287
of 313,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Nursing Review
#9
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,048,564 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 305 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,286 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.