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Lethal hopelessness: Understanding and responding to asylum seeker distress and mental deterioration

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 758)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
81 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Lethal hopelessness: Understanding and responding to asylum seeker distress and mental deterioration
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, March 2017
DOI 10.1111/inm.12325
Pubmed ID
Authors

Procter, Nicholas G., Kenny, Mary Anne, Eaton, Heather, Grech, Carol, Nicholas G. Procter, Mary Anne Kenny, Heather Eaton, Carol Grech

Abstract

The mental deterioration of the so called 'legacy caseload' (asylum seekers who arrived in Australia by boat between August 2012-December 2013) has become a national concern and is garnering international attention. Prolonged uncertainty is contributing to mental deterioration and despair. There have been at least 11 deaths by suicide since June 2014. Social support services have been limited and legal assistance in short supply; this is associated with lengthy delays with visa applications. Thwarted belongingness, purpose and identity, a shortage of available services, and barriers to legal support for processes attendant upon Refugee Status Determination increase the likelihood that the mental health of asylum seekers will deteriorate further, potentially developing into worsening decline, which will lead to increased self-harm and suicide. This article summarises recent suicide deaths in Australia, positing practical assistance and support for asylum seekers living in the community. Therapeutic engagement should be trauma-informed wherever possible, helping asylum seekers to reframe their sense of lethal hopelessness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 81 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Student > Master 4 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Researcher 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 53%
Unspecified 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2018.
All research outputs
#223,002
of 12,119,749 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
#5
of 758 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,130
of 265,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
#1
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,119,749 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 758 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,637 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.