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Predicting the sensitivity of butterfly phenology to temperature over the past century

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 2,084)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Predicting the sensitivity of butterfly phenology to temperature over the past century
Published in
Global Change Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12429
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kharouba, Heather M., Paquette, Sebastien R., Kerr, Jeremy T., Vellend, Mark, Kharouba HM, Paquette SR, Kerr JT, Vellend M

Abstract

Studies to date have documented substantial variation among species in the degree to which phenology responds to temperature and shifts over time, but we have a limited understanding of the causes of such variation. Here, we use a spatially and temporally extensive data set (ca. 48 000 observations from across Canada) to evaluate the utility of museum collection records in detecting broad-scale phenology-temperature relationships and to test for systematic differences in the sensitivity of phenology to temperature (days °C(-1) ) of Canadian butterfly species according to relevant ecological traits. We showed that the timing of flight season predictably responded to temperature both across space (variation in average temperature from site to site in Canada) and across time (variation from year to year within each individual site). This reveals that collection records, a vastly underexploited resource, can be applied to the quantification of broad-scale relationships between species' phenology and temperature. The timing of the flight season of earlier fliers and less mobile species was more sensitive to temperature than later fliers and more mobile species, demonstrating that ecological traits can account for some of the interspecific variation in species' phenological sensitivity to temperature. Finally, we found that phenological sensitivity to temperature differed across time and space implying that both dimensions of temperature will be needed to translate species' phenological sensitivity to temperature into accurate predictions of species' future phenological shifts. Given the widespread temperature sensitivity of flight season timing, we can expect long-term temporal shifts with increased warming [ca. 2.4 days °C(-1) (0.18 SE)] for many if not most butterfly species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 5%
Spain 3 4%
Germany 3 4%
Canada 3 4%
France 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Finland 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 57 77%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 26%
Student > Master 14 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 68%
Environmental Science 15 20%
Unspecified 3 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 104. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2014.
All research outputs
#55,702
of 6,713,246 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#34
of 2,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,463
of 160,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,713,246 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,084 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,283 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.