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Particulate matter air pollution and liver cancer survival

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Cancer, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
49 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Particulate matter air pollution and liver cancer survival
Published in
International Journal of Cancer, June 2017
DOI 10.1002/ijc.30779
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huiyu Deng, Sandrah P. Eckel, Lihua Liu, Frederick W. Lurmann, Myles G. Cockburn, Frank D. Gilliland

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) air pollution exposure has been associated with cancer incidence and mortality especially with lung cancer. The liver is another organ possibly affected by PM due to its role in detoxifying xenobiotics absorbed from PM. Various studies have investigated the mechanistic pathways between inhaled pollutants and liver damage, cancer incidence, and tumor progression. However, little is known about the effects of PM on liver cancer survival. Twenty thousand, two hundred and twenty-one California Cancer Registry patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 were used to examine the effect of exposure to ambient PM with diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5 ) on HCC survival. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) relating PM2.5 to all-cause and liver cancer-specific mortality linearly and nonlinearly-overall and stratified by stage at diagnosis (local, regional and distant)-adjusting for potential individual and geospatial confounders.PM2.5 exposure after diagnosis was statistically significantly associated with HCC survival. After adjustment for potential confounders, the all-cause mortality HR associated with a 1 standard deviation (5.0 µg/m(3) ) increase in PM2.5 was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.16-1.20); 1.31 (95% CI:1.26-1.35) for local stage, 1.19 (95% CI:1.14-1.23) for regional stage, and 1.05 (95% CI:1.01-1.10) for distant stage. These associations were nonlinear, with substantially larger HRs at higher exposures. The associations between liver cancer-specific mortality and PM2.5 were slightly attenuated compared to all-cause mortality, but with the same patterns.Exposure to elevated PM2.5 after the diagnosis of HCC may shorten survival, with larger effects at higher concentrations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 11 21%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Environmental Science 5 9%
Computer Science 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 12 23%
Unknown 18 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 99. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2017.
All research outputs
#351,262
of 22,497,510 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Cancer
#112
of 11,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,007
of 291,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Cancer
#4
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,497,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,568 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.