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Formin 2 links neuropsychiatric phenotypes at young age to an increased risk for dementia

Overview of attention for article published in EMBO Journal, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 4,568)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
Title
Formin 2 links neuropsychiatric phenotypes at young age to an increased risk for dementia
Published in
EMBO Journal, July 2017
DOI 10.15252/embj.201796821
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roberto Carlos Agís‐Balboa, Paulo Pinhero, Nelson Rebola, Cemil Kerimoglu, Eva Benito, Michael Gertig, Sanaz Bahari‐Javan, Gaurav Jain, Susanne Burkhardt, Ivana Delalle, Alexander Jatzko, Markus Dettenhofer, Patricia A Zunszain, Andrea Schmitt, Peter Falkai, Julius C Pape, Elisabeth B Binder, Christophe Mulle, Andre Fischer, Farahnaz Sananbenesi, Agís‐Balboa, Roberto Carlos, Pinhero, Paulo, Rebola, Nelson, Kerimoglu, Cemil, Benito, Eva, Gertig, Michael, Bahari‐Javan, Sanaz, Jain, Gaurav, Burkhardt, Susanne, Delalle, Ivana, Jatzko, Alexander, Dettenhofer, Markus, Zunszain, Patricia A, Schmitt, Andrea, Falkai, Peter, Pape, Julius C, Binder, Elisabeth B, Mulle, Christophe, Fischer, Andre, Sananbenesi, Farahnaz, Paulo S Pinheiro

Abstract

Age-associated memory decline is due to variable combinations of genetic and environmental risk factors. How these risk factors interact to drive disease onset is currently unknown. Here we begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at a young age contributes to an increased risk to develop dementia at old age. We show that the actin nucleator Formin 2 (Fmn2) is deregulated in PTSD and in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Young mice lacking the Fmn2 gene exhibit PTSD-like phenotypes and corresponding impairments of synaptic plasticity, while the consolidation of new memories is unaffected. However, Fmn2 mutant mice develop accelerated age-associated memory decline that is further increased in the presence of additional risk factors and is mechanistically linked to a loss of transcriptional homeostasis. In conclusion, our data present a new approach to explore the connection between AD risk factors across life span and provide mechanistic insight to the processes by which neuropsychiatric diseases at a young age affect the risk for developing dementia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 31%
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Professor 2 15%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 7 54%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 23%
Unspecified 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 125. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2017.
All research outputs
#68,947
of 8,614,618 outputs
Outputs from EMBO Journal
#10
of 4,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,825
of 240,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EMBO Journal
#1
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,614,618 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,568 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.