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A continental scale trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
224 Mendeley
Title
A continental scale trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, July 2014
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12258
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas M. Newsome, William J. Ripple

Abstract

Top-down processes, via the direct and indirect effects of interspecific competitive killing (no consumption of the kill) or intraguild predation (consumption of the kill), can potentially influence the spatial distribution of terrestrial predators, but few studies have demonstrated the phenomenon at a continental scale. For example, in North America, grey wolves Canis lupus are known to kill coyotes Canis latrans, and coyotes, in turn, may kill foxes Vulpes spp., but the spatial effects of these competitive interactions at large scales are unknown. Here, we analyse fur return data across eight jurisdictions in North America to test whether the presence or absence of wolves has caused a continent-wide shift in coyote and red fox Vulpes vulpes density. Our results support the existence of a continental scale cascade whereby coyotes outnumber red foxes in areas where wolves have been extirpated by humans, whereas red foxes outnumber coyotes in areas where wolves are present. However, for a distance of up to 200 km on the edge of wolf distribution, there is a transition zone where the effects of top-down control are weakened, possibly due to the rapid dispersal and reinvasion capabilities of coyotes into areas where wolves are sporadically distributed or at low densities. Our results have implications for understanding how the restoration of wolf populations across North America could potentially affect co-occurring predators and prey. We conclude that large carnivores may need to occupy large continuous areas to facilitate among-carnivore cascades and that studies of small areas may not be indicative of the effects of top-down mesopredator control.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 224 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
India 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 212 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 55 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 20%
Researcher 39 17%
Student > Bachelor 32 14%
Other 12 5%
Other 41 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 133 59%
Environmental Science 57 25%
Unspecified 17 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 1%
Other 9 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 64. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2018.
All research outputs
#247,874
of 13,002,044 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#57
of 1,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,289
of 189,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#2
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,002,044 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,878 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.