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Terminal spreading depolarization and electrical silence in death of human cerebral cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Neurology, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 4,414)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
34 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
115 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
143 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Terminal spreading depolarization and electrical silence in death of human cerebral cortex
Published in
Annals of Neurology, February 2018
DOI 10.1002/ana.25147
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jens P. Dreier, Sebastian Major, Brandon Foreman, Maren K. L. Winkler, Eun-Jeung Kang, Denny Milakara, Coline L. Lemale, Vince DiNapoli, Jason M. Hinzman, Johannes Woitzik, Norberto Andaluz, Andrew Carlson, Jed A. Hartings

Abstract

Restoring the circulation is the primary goal in emergency treatment of cerebral ischemia. However, better understanding of how the brain responds to energy depletion could inform the time available for resuscitation until irreversible damage and advance development of interventions that prolong this span. Experimentally, injury to central neurons begins only with anoxic depolarization. This potentially reversible, spreading wave typically starts 2-5 min after the onset of severe ischemia, marking the onset of a toxic intraneuronal change that eventually results in irreversible injury. To investigate this in the human brain, we performed recordings with either subdural electrode strips (n=4) or intraparenchymal electrode arrays (n=5) in patients with devastating brain injury that resulted in activation of a Do Not Resuscitate-Comfort Care order followed by terminal extubation. Withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies produced a decline in brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pti O2 ) and circulatory arrest. Silencing of spontaneous electrical activity developed simultaneously across regional electrode arrays in eight patients. This silencing, termed 'nonspreading depression', developed during the steep falling phase of pti O2 (intraparenchymal sensor, n=6) at 11 (7, 14) mmHg. Terminal spreading depolarizations started to propagate between electrodes 3.9 (2.6, 6.3) min after onset of the final drop in perfusion and 13 to 266s after nonspreading depression. In one patient, terminal spreading depolarization induced the initial electrocerebral silence in a spreading depression pattern; circulatory arrest developed thereafter. These results provide fundamental insight into the neurobiology of dying and have important implications for survivable cerebral ischemic insults. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 115 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 143 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 143 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 41 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Master 14 10%
Professor 11 8%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 19 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 42 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 8%
Psychology 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 34 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 365. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2020.
All research outputs
#40,823
of 15,879,997 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Neurology
#21
of 4,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,003
of 407,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Neurology
#1
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,879,997 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 407,861 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.