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The 4D nucleome: Evidence for a dynamic nuclear landscape based on co-aligned active and inactive nuclear compartments.

Overview of attention for article published in Febs Letters, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Readers on

mendeley
132 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
The 4D nucleome: Evidence for a dynamic nuclear landscape based on co-aligned active and inactive nuclear compartments.
Published in
Febs Letters, June 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.febslet.2015.05.037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cremer, Thomas, Cremer, Marion, Hübner, Barbara, Strickfaden, Hilmar, Smeets, Daniel, Popken, Jens, Sterr, Michael, Markaki, Yolanda, Rippe, Karsten, Cremer, Christoph

Abstract

Recent methodological advancements in microscopy and DNA sequencing-based methods provide unprecedented new insights into the spatio-temporal relationships between chromatin and functional nuclear machineries. We discuss a model of functional nuclear organization derived mostly from electron and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy studies. It is based on two spatially co-aligned, active and inactive nuclear compartments (ANC and INC). The INC comprises the compact, transcriptionally inactive core of chromatin domain clusters (CDCs). The ANC is formed by the transcriptionally active periphery of CDCs, called the perichromatin region (PR), and the interchromatin compartment (IC). The IC is connected to nuclear pores and serves nuclear import and export functions. The ANC is the major site of RNA synthesis. It is highly enriched in epigenetic marks for transcriptionally competent chromatin and RNA Polymerase II. Marks for silent chromatin are enriched in the INC. Multi-scale cross-correlation spectroscopy suggests that nuclear architecture resembles a random obstacle network for diffusing proteins. An increased dwell time of proteins and protein complexes within the ANC may help to limit genome scanning by factors or factor complexes to DNA exposed within the ANC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
France 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Czech Republic 2 2%
Russian Federation 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 118 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 42 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 24%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Student > Master 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 20 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 71 54%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 23%
Physics and Astronomy 8 6%
Computer Science 5 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 3%
Other 13 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2016.
All research outputs
#1,533,890
of 7,724,913 outputs
Outputs from Febs Letters
#273
of 4,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,829
of 219,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Febs Letters
#7
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,724,913 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,101 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.