↓ Skip to main content

Wiley Online Library

Daily, seasonal, and latitudinal variations in solar ultraviolet A and B radiation in relation to vitamin D production and risk for skin cancer

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Dermatology, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
34 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
Title
Daily, seasonal, and latitudinal variations in solar ultraviolet A and B radiation in relation to vitamin D production and risk for skin cancer
Published in
International Journal of Dermatology, November 2015
DOI 10.1111/ijd.13065
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mantas Grigalavicius, Johan Moan, Arne Dahlback, Asta Juzeniene

Abstract

Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation varies with latitude, time of day, and season. Both spectral UV composition and ambient UV dose lead to different health outcomes at different latitudes. Finding the optimal time for sun exposure, whereby the positive effects of UV exposure (vitamin D) are facilitated and the negative effects (skin cancer, photoimmunosuppression) avoided are the most important consideration in modern skin cancer prevention programs. This paper focuses on the latitude dependency of UVB, UVA, vitamin D production, and skin cancer risk in Caucasians. Biologically effective UVB (280-315 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) doses were calculated using radiative transfer models with appropriate climatologic data for selected locations. Incidences of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cutaneous melanoma (CM) were retrieved from cancer registries and published articles. Annual doses of UVA radiation decrease much less with increasing latitude than annual doses of UVB. Incidences of CM also decrease less steeply with increasing latitude than incidences of SCC. As SCC is caused mainly by UVB, these observations support the assumption that UVA plays an important role in the development of CM. The variations in UVA (relevant to CM) and UVB (relevant to vitamin D production) over 1 day differ: the UVB : UVA ratio is maximal at noon. The best way to obtain a given dose of vitamin D with minimal carcinogenic risk is through a non-burning exposure in the middle of the day, rather than in the afternoon or morning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Costa Rica 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 92 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 17%
Student > Bachelor 16 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Researcher 5 5%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 9%
Engineering 6 6%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 26 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2022.
All research outputs
#702,925
of 21,724,962 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Dermatology
#54
of 3,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,101
of 301,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Dermatology
#1
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,724,962 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,202 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,866 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.