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Vascular binding of a pathogen under shear force through mechanistically distinct sequential interactions with host macromolecules

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Microbiology, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Vascular binding of a pathogen under shear force through mechanistically distinct sequential interactions with host macromolecules
Published in
Molecular Microbiology, January 2012
DOI 10.1111/mmi.12045
Pubmed ID
Authors

Moriarty, Tara J., Shi, Meiqing, Lin, Yi‐Pin, Ebady, Rhodaba, Zhou, Hong, Odisho, Tanya, Hardy, Pierre‐Olivier, Salman‐Dilgimen, Aydan, Wu, Jing, Weening, Eric H., Skare, Jon T., Kubes, Paul, Leong, John, Chaconas, George

Abstract

Systemic dissemination of microbial pathogens permits microbes to spread from the initial site of infection to secondary target tissues and is responsible for most mortality due to bacterial infections. Dissemination is a critical stage of disease progression by the Lyme spirochaete, Borrelia burgdorferi. However, many mechanistic features of the process are not yet understood. A key step is adhesion of circulating microbes to vascular surfaces in the face of the shear forces present in flowing blood. Using real-time microscopic imaging of the Lyme spirochaete in living mice we previously identified the first bacterial protein (B. burgdorferi BBK32) shown to mediate vascular adhesion in vivo. Vascular adhesion is also dependent on host fibronectin (Fn) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BBK32-dependent vascular adhesion in vivo. We determined that BBK32-Fn interactions (tethering) function as a molecular braking mechanism that permits the formation of more stable BBK32-GAG interactions (dragging) between circulating bacteria and vascular surfaces. Since BBK32-like proteins are expressed in a variety of pathogens we believe that the vascular adhesion mechanisms we have deciphered here may be critical for understanding the dissemination mechanisms of other bacterial pathogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Sweden 1 6%
Canada 1 6%
Unknown 13 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Researcher 3 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Professor 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 56%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2017.
All research outputs
#574,793
of 7,822,782 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Microbiology
#53
of 2,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,349
of 94,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Microbiology
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,822,782 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,567 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,222 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.