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Global meta‐analysis of native and nonindigenous trophic traits in aquatic ecosystems

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

43 tweeters
1 Facebook page

Readers on

46 Mendeley
Global meta‐analysis of native and nonindigenous trophic traits in aquatic ecosystems
Published in
Global Change Biology, October 2016
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13524
Pubmed ID

McKnight, Ella, García‐Berthou, Emili, Srean, Pao, Rius, Marc, Ella McKnight, EMILI GARCÍ A-BERTHOU, PAO SREAN, MARC RIUS


Ecologists have recently devoted their attention to the study of species traits and their role in the establishment and spread of nonindigenous species (NIS). However, research efforts have mostly focused on studies of terrestrial taxa, with lesser attention being dedicated to aquatic species. Aquatic habitats comprise of interconnected waterways, as well as exclusive introduction vectors that allow unparalleled artificial transport of species and their propagules. Consequently, species traits that commonly facilitate biological invasions in terrestrial systems may not be as represented in aquatic environments. We provide a global meta-analysis of studies conducted in both marine and freshwater habitats. We selected studies that conducted experiments with native and NIS under common environmental conditions to allow detailed comparisons among species traits. In addition, we explored whether different factors such as species relatedness, functional feeding groups, latitude, climate, and experimental conditions could be linked to predictive traits. Our results show that species with traits that enhance consumption and growth have a substantially increased probability of establishing and spreading when entering novel ecosystems. Moreover, traits associated with predatory avoidance were more prevalent in NIS and therefore favour invasive species in aquatic habitats. When we analysed NIS interacting with taxonomically distinctive native taxa, we found that consumption and growth were particularly important traits. This suggests that particular attention should be paid to newly introduced species for which there are no close relatives in the local biota. Finally, we found a bias towards studies conducted in temperate regions, and thus, more studies in other climatic regions are needed. We conclude that studies aiming at predicting future range shifts should consider trophic traits of aquatic NIS as these traits are indicative of multiple interacting mechanisms involved in promoting species invasions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Cambodia 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 39 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 30%
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 11%
Other 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 59%
Environmental Science 12 26%
Unspecified 3 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2017.
All research outputs
of 8,940,530 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
of 2,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age
of 252,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,940,530 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,871 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.