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Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones

Overview of attention for article published in Evolution, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#19 of 4,719)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
Title
Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones
Published in
Evolution, October 2014
DOI 10.1111/evo.12516
Pubmed ID
Authors

James P. Dines, Erik Otárola‐Castillo, Peter Ralph, Jesse Alas, Timothy Daley, Andrew D. Smith, Matthew D. Dean

Abstract

Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis that seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here, we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: (1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) tend to evolve larger penises and pelvic bones compared to their body length, and (2) pelvic bone shape has diverged more in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 96 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 21%
Student > Master 16 15%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 7 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 75 72%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 195. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2021.
All research outputs
#123,999
of 19,195,752 outputs
Outputs from Evolution
#19
of 4,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,274
of 211,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Evolution
#1
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,195,752 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,719 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.