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Psychological interventions to reduce positive symptoms in schizophrenia: systematic review and network meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in World Psychiatry, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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116 tweeters

Citations

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57 Dimensions

Readers on

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162 Mendeley
Title
Psychological interventions to reduce positive symptoms in schizophrenia: systematic review and network meta-analysis
Published in
World Psychiatry, September 2018
DOI 10.1002/wps.20577
Pubmed ID
Authors

Irene Bighelli, Georgia Salanti, Maximilian Huhn, Johannes Schneider-Thoma, Marc Krause, Cornelia Reitmeir, Sofia Wallis, Felicitas Schwermann, Gabi Pitschel-Walz, Corrado Barbui, Toshi A. Furukawa, Stefan Leucht

Abstract

Psychological treatments are increasingly regarded as useful interventions for schizophrenia. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the available evidence is lacking and the benefit of psychological interventions for patients with current positive symptoms is still debated. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of psychological treatments for positive symptoms of schizophrenia by applying a network meta-analysis approach, that can integrate direct and indirect comparisons. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, BIOSIS, Cochrane Library, World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and ClinicalTrials.gov for randomized controlled trials of psychological treatments for positive symptoms of schizophrenia, published up to January 10, 2018. We included studies on adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or a related disorder presenting positive symptoms. The primary outcome was change in positive symptoms measured with validated rating scales. We included 53 randomized controlled trials of seven psychological interventions, for a total of 4,068 participants receiving the psychological treatment as add-on to antipsychotics. On average, patients were moderately ill at baseline. The network meta-analysis showed that cognitive behavioural therapy (40 studies) reduced positive symptoms more than inactive control (standardized mean difference, SMD=-0.29; 95% CI: -0.55 to -0.03), treatment as usual (SMD=-0.30; 95% CI: -0.45 to -0.14) and supportive therapy (SMD=-0.47; 95% CI: -0.91 to -0.03). Cognitive behavioural therapy was associated with a higher dropout rate compared with treatment as usual (risk ratio, RR=0.74; 95% CI: 0.58 to 0.95). Confidence in the estimates ranged from moderate to very low. The other treatments contributed to the network with a lower number of studies. Results were overall consistent in sensitivity analyses controlling for several factors, including the role of researchers' allegiance and blinding of outcome assessor. Cognitive behavior therapy seems to be effective on positive symptoms in moderately ill patients with schizophrenia, with effect sizes in the lower to medium range, depending on the control condition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 116 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 162 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 15%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Master 15 9%
Other 13 8%
Other 33 20%
Unknown 32 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 69 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 2%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Other 14 9%
Unknown 44 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2021.
All research outputs
#386,975
of 19,171,602 outputs
Outputs from World Psychiatry
#89
of 903 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,358
of 288,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Psychiatry
#4
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,171,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 903 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.