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Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Cancer, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis
Published in
International Journal of Cancer, February 2016
DOI 10.1002/ijc.30033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aurélie Ernst, David T W Jones, Kendra K Maass, Agata Rode, Katharina I Deeg, Billy Michael Chelliah Jebaraj, Andrey Korshunov, Volker Hovestadt, Michael A Tainsky, Kristian W Pajtler, Sebastian Bender, Sebastian Brabetz, Susanne Gröbner, Marcel Kool, Frauke Devens, Jennifer Edelmann, Cindy Zhang, Pedro Castelo-Branco, Uri Tabori, David Malkin, Karsten Rippe, Stephan Stilgenbauer, Stefan M Pfister, Marc Zapatka, Peter Lichter

Abstract

Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 85 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 18%
Student > Master 12 14%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 19 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 1%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 21 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2023.
All research outputs
#8,253,518
of 25,378,162 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Cancer
#4,863
of 12,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,981
of 312,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Cancer
#41
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,378,162 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.