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Mortality of emergency abdominal surgery in high-, middle- and low-income countries

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Surgery, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 3,974)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
394 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
110 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
400 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Mortality of emergency abdominal surgery in high-, middle- and low-income countries
Published in
British Journal of Surgery, May 2016
DOI 10.1002/bjs.10151
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Surgical mortality data are collected routinely in high-income countries, yet virtually no low- or middle-income countries have outcome surveillance in place. The aim was prospectively to collect worldwide mortality data following emergency abdominal surgery, comparing findings across countries with a low, middle or high Human Development Index (HDI). This was a prospective, multicentre, cohort study. Self-selected hospitals performing emergency surgery submitted prespecified data for consecutive patients from at least one 2-week interval during July to December 2014. Postoperative mortality was analysed by hierarchical multivariable logistic regression. Data were obtained for 10 745 patients from 357 centres in 58 countries; 6538 were from high-, 2889 from middle- and 1318 from low-HDI settings. The overall mortality rate was 1·6 per cent at 24 h (high 1·1 per cent, middle 1·9 per cent, low 3·4 per cent; P < 0·001), increasing to 5·4 per cent by 30 days (high 4·5 per cent, middle 6·0 per cent, low 8·6 per cent; P < 0·001). Of the 578 patients who died, 404 (69·9 per cent) did so between 24 h and 30 days following surgery (high 74·2 per cent, middle 68·8 per cent, low 60·5 per cent). After adjustment, 30-day mortality remained higher in middle-income (odds ratio (OR) 2·78, 95 per cent c.i. 1·84 to 4·20) and low-income (OR 2·97, 1·84 to 4·81) countries. Surgical safety checklist use was less frequent in low- and middle-income countries, but when used was associated with reduced mortality at 30 days. Mortality is three times higher in low- compared with high-HDI countries even when adjusted for prognostic factors. Patient safety factors may have an important role. Registration number: NCT02179112 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 394 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 400 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Egypt 5 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Unknown 390 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 52 13%
Other 47 12%
Researcher 40 10%
Student > Master 32 8%
Student > Postgraduate 31 8%
Other 131 33%
Unknown 67 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 251 63%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 3%
Engineering 6 2%
Social Sciences 6 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 2%
Other 18 5%
Unknown 100 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 374. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2020.
All research outputs
#40,375
of 16,073,961 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Surgery
#8
of 3,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,322
of 265,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Surgery
#3
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,073,961 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,974 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,841 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.