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Individual personality differences in Port Jackson sharks Heterodontus portusjacksoni

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Fish Biology, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 4,659)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
30 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
67 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
Title
Individual personality differences in Port Jackson sharks Heterodontus portusjacksoni
Published in
Journal of Fish Biology, May 2016
DOI 10.1111/jfb.12993
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. E. Byrnes, C. Brown

Abstract

This study examined interindividual personality differences between Port Jackson sharks Heterodontus portusjacksoni utilizing a standard boldness assay. Additionally, the correlation between differences in individual boldness and stress reactivity was examined, exploring indications of individual coping styles. Heterodontus portusjacksoni demonstrated highly repeatable individual differences in boldness and stress reactivity. Individual boldness scores were highly repeatable across four trials such that individuals that were the fastest to emerge in the first trial were also the fastest to emerge in subsequent trials. Additionally, individuals that were the most reactive to a handling stressor in the first trial were also the most reactive in a second trial. The strong link between boldness and stress response commonly found in teleosts was also evident in this study, providing evidence of proactive-reactive coping styles in H. portusjacksoni. These results demonstrate the presence of individual personality differences in sharks for the first time. Understanding how personality influences variation in elasmobranch behaviour such as prey choice, habitat use and activity levels is critical to better managing these top predators which play important ecological roles in marine ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 67 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 2 2%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 86 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 25%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 35%
Environmental Science 17 19%
Unspecified 4 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 22 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 322. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2022.
All research outputs
#85,421
of 22,759,618 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Fish Biology
#9
of 4,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,986
of 336,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Fish Biology
#1
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,759,618 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,659 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,775 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.